07-30-2020 Outdoors

Fishing

The Department of Natural Resources (DNR) reported that recent storms and strong winds slowed fishing effort, especially on the Great Lakes. Inland lake fishing for bass and panfish should be fair to good. Stream temperatures are over 70 degrees, since it can make catch and release more difficult.

Ellinee Bait & Tackle located on Paw Paw Lake by Coloma reports slow fishing on the local inland lakes. The bite has been slow, but anglers are still catching bluegills, crappie, and other panfish. Bass fishing is going strong on the local lakes, both small mouth and large mouth. Some anglers are casting under docks, while others from boats or shore are having an enjoyable time.

Perch fishing by South Haven was not consistent. Some anglers are catching lots of fish while many others are struggling. Most perch were being caught in 20 to 60 feet of water south of the pier. Pier fishing was very slow except for freshwater drum. Salmon anglers are catching a few lake trout in 100 feet or so, on the bottom.

There was excellent perch fishing out of St. Joseph; the fish are somewhat scattered but anglers who work at it are catching limits. Fish were caught both north and south of the piers in water as shallow as 18 feet or as deep as 50 feet. Salmon anglers are catching lake trout in good numbers in 80 to 130 feet. The occasional steelhead and salmon were also caught on spoons. Pier anglers targeting steelhead had slow fishing as the water around the pier is too warm. A lot of freshwater drum were caught.

By Holland, a mix of salmon and trout were caught 50 to 100 feet down in 90 to 180 feet. Salmon were hitting on a variety of spoons, flies and meat rigs while lake trout were hitting yellow spin-glo on the bottom. A couple freshwater drum were caught when casting spoons or using dead bait on the bottom.

The Michigan Department of Environment, Great Lakes, and Energy (EGLE) announced that Michigan will adopt a rule set creating some of the nation’s most comprehensive regulations limiting PFAS contamination in drinking water.

“All Michiganders deserve to know that we’re prioritizing their health and are continuing to work every day to protect the water coming out of their taps,” said Gov. Gretchen Whitmer. “Michigan is once again leading the way nationally in fighting PFAS contamination by setting our own science-based drinking water standard. As a result, we will be better protecting Michiganders across our state.”

Known to scientists as per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances, PFAS are a group of potentially harmful contaminants used in thousands of applications globally including firefighting foam, food packaging and many other consumer products. These compounds also are used by industries such as tanneries, metal platers and clothing manufacturers. For more about PFAS, visit the MPART website.

Hunting

Upper Peninsula archers in select DMUs may pursue antlerless deer with their deer/deer combo license. The following DMUs continue to be closed to antlerless harvest during the archery seasons: 027, 031, 036, 042, 066, 127, and 131. Additional DMUs may be open or closed based on the snowfall totals from the prior winter, pending DNR analysis. Please see the 2020 Hunting Digest for complete regulations when it becomes available in August.

Antler point restrictions have been removed on the deer license in parts of DMU 122, including areas outside the core chronic wasting disease surveillance area.

In the Lower Peninsula, in addition to the archery season, antlerless deer may be taken on the deer/deer combo license during the firearm and muzzleloader seasons in all Lower Peninsula DMUs. Early and late antlerless seasons will be open in all Lower Peninsula mainland DMUs.

Antlerless deer may be taken on a deer/deer combo license during both the early and late antlerless seasons in the Lower Peninsula. Antlerless quotas will change in select DMUs.

The muzzleloader season in the southern Lower Peninsula will be shortened to 10 days and the late antlerless firearm season will begin the Monday after the muzzleloader season concludes in the Lower Peninsula. Muzzleloaders can be used on public lands in Zone 3 during the late antlerless firearm season to take any deer with a valid tag.

All legal firearms may be used during the muzzleloader season in the southern Lower Peninsula.

Carcass movement restrictions will be scaled to areas most affected by Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD). This aligns movement restrictions to areas where the highest risk of CWD is being observed.

The expanded archery season through January 31 will continue for one more year in Wayne, Oakland and Macomb counties. It previously expired January 31, 2020.

The 2020 Hunting Digest will have further information regarding these regulations. The digest is in the process of being finalized now that regulations are set. Watch for the current digest in August at Michigan.gov/DNRDigests.

As the summer evenings grow longer so do the nightly concerts of the katydids. These members of the grasshopper family are very difficult to find during the day. Their green color perfectly matches the leaves where they sit to eat and their wings look like leaves.

They aren’t any easier to see at night, but you can easily locate them by following their distinctive song – katy-katy-katydid. That’s what the female katydids do. They use the ears on their front legs to detect the males’ sounds.

The males produce the sound by rubbing their wings together like a violin and bow. After they have mated, the females lay their eggs on leaves or twigs; the eggs will overwinter there. In the spring katydid nymphs will emerge. They look like miniatures of the adults, including the very long, thin antennae, but lack wings.

The nymphs will feed on the leaves just as their parents did. Wings will develop as the nymph grows and molts throughout the spring.

Visit our Butterfly House at Sarett this summer by making an appointment through our online store, which can be found through www.sarett.org. Walk-ups will be given appointments if there is availability. The main building remains closed at this time, but our trails are open dawn to dusk. The Butterfly House is open Tuesdays through Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Sundays from 1 to 4 p.m.

0 comments

Related Posts

See All

Nature Notebook

As a precaution to the emerging mysterious songbird sickness hitting birds across the eastern United States, we have taken down our bird feeders at the Nature Center. While there have not been any con