09-10-2020 WAY Graduates; HOPE Resources loses Community Soup Supper fundraising

DIPLOMAS AWARDED… Watervliet High School WAY Program hosted its summer graduation ceremony recently. Seven young ladies and gentlemen earned their high school diploma during this very unusual time of a worldwide health pandemic. These students persevered through being quarantined and not being able to come to school to get help. All of these students did a great job of reaching out when they needed it. Out of this group, there are future police, teachers, nurses, cosmetologists, business people, authors, and more! Attending the outdoor ceremony was (from the left): Hailey Wright, Ariel Collins, and Sam Munson. Also receiving his diploma this summer is Wyatt Howard (far left). WAY students graduating but not pictured are Hunter Charles, Hailey Smith, and Cody Decker.


V.B. Museum yard sale

Van Buren County Historical Museum is holding their 2nd Annual Yard Sale on Saturday, Sept. 19 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Set up is at 8 a.m., in the parking lot. Rain date is Sept. 26. Space rental is $20 for 10’ x10’ space. Sellers need to bring their own tables and lunch, also a canopy for shelter. Call 269-621-2188 to reserve a spot. Fee must be paid prior to sale; $25.00 if paid on day of sale. Van Buren Co. Historical Museum is located at 58471 Red Arrow in Hartford.

THIS KUTE KID IS… Austin O’Neill at 5 years old, son of Antonio and Bailey O’Neill from Hartford. Austin’s siblings are Aubrey, Aidan and Ashton O’Neill. Danny and Amanda Costner (Hartford), Cecil and Angela Jackson (Watervliet), and Judi Nail also of Watervliet are the loving grandparents of this family of grandchildren.


N.B. Museum welcomes Sam Monte for video program,

Sept. 15

Since 1925, the Monte family has been dedicated to manufacturing and supplying the finest produce containers available. In 2014, the Monte Package Company donated 22 basket making machines that were made by two Twin City companies—St. Joe Iron Works and Saranac Machine Co.—to the North Berrien Historical Museum. This machinery collection became a permanent exhibit at the Museum in 2017. On Tuesday, Sept. 15 at 7:00 p.m., a pre-recorded presentation by Sam Monte will become available on the North Berrien Historical Museum’s Facebook page. During his presentation, Sam will be discussing the machinery collection and detail several local businesses that made Southwest Michigan into one of the major fruit and vegetable producers in the country. Please contact peter@northberrienhistory.org with any questions.

HOPE Resources loses Community Soup Supper fund raising for balance of year

HOPE Resources of Coloma has been informed that the monthly soup suppers held as fundraisers will not happen for the remainder of 2020. The Community Soup Suppers in the past have been hosted by the North Berrien Senior Center with meal preparation by various local organizations. Proceeds from these dinners have been donated to HOPE Resources food pantry to assist local families in need. The North Berrien Senior Center Board sent a letter to HOPE Resources informing them that the center is closed to all non-senior center activity through the end of the year. Loss of these monthly fundraisers has resulted in an estimated $3,000 loss of revenue for the food pantry.

Grandparents: Consider these financial moves

Each year, on the first Sunday after Labor Day, we observe National Grandparents Day. Although it’s not as widely recognized as Mother’s Day or Father’s Day, if you’re a grandparent, you probably want to do whatever you can to help your grandchildren on their journeys through life. So, you might want to consider the following moves: Contribute to their education. If you want to help your grandchildren pay for college, you have a variety of options, including 529 plans. You could also simply set aside some money in an investment account earmarked for education. But you don’t just have to stick to helping out financially – you might also want to do some research to see what scholarships are available. Consider a UGMA/UTMA account. The Uniform Gifts to Minors Act (UGMA) and Uniform Transfer to Minors Act (UTMA) are custodial accounts that provide a relatively easy way for you to give money to your young grandchildren. A financial advisor can help determine if such a plan is right for you. However, once you put money into the UGMA or UTMA, you no longer have any legal access or authority over the funds unless you are the custodian managing the account. After children reach the age of majority – typically 18 or 21 – or the age of termination if the state where they live allows for the assets to be held until a later age, they will control the assets, and they may not want to use the money as you had envisioned, such as for college. (Also, tax issues for custodial accounts can be complicated, so, before opening an UGMA or UTMA, you’ll want to consult with your tax advisor.) Consider gifts to older grandchildren. If you have older grandchildren, you might want to help them out if they’re saving for a down payment on a home, or are between jobs, or perhaps are even having children of their own. You can give $15,000 per year, per individual, without having to file a gift tax return. Your spouse can also give $15,000 per year to the same individual, again without triggering the need for a gift tax return. Review your will. If you’ve already created your last will and testament, you may want to review it upon the arrival of grandchildren. You can include specific instructions, such as requiring your grandchildren to turn a specific age before they can receive their inheritance. You could also codify the same requirements through the use of a living trust. Contact your legal advisor to determine if such a trust is appropriate for your situation. Update beneficiary designations. If you want your grandchildren to receive proceeds from various accounts, such as your 401(k), IRA and life insurance, you may need to update the beneficiary designations, which can even supersede the instructions on your will. Keep in mind that if you have grandchildren with special needs, you may want to designate a supplemental needs trust for your grandchild as the beneficiary instead of naming your grandchild directly. Again, contact your legal advisor for more information. These aren’t the only steps you can take to help your grandchildren, but they should give you some options to consider. The world is an expensive place, and any assistance you can provide to your beloved grandkids can make a big difference in their lives.

This article was written by Edward Jones for use by your local Edward Jones Financial Advisor. Edward Jones, Member SIPC Edward Jones, its employees and financial advisors are not estate planners and cannot provide tax or legal advice. You should consult your estate-planning attorney or qualified tax advisor regarding your situation.

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