11-29-18 Outdoors

Fishing The Department of Natural Resources (DNR) notes that very few anglers have been out; however with a warm up by this weekend, this would be a good time to head out. Pier anglers target steelhead and whitefish this time of year. The pike action is also good as the fish go on a feeding frenzy before first ice.

TALE OF THE HUNT… 8:02 opening morning on Nov. 15, 2018 Julie Holtsclaw of Watervliet was hunting in Berrien County with no doe permit and the first deer she saw was a doe! Then at 4:45 p.m. the same doe shows back up coming back the way it left in the morning. All of a sudden the doe bolted in the opposite direction and then a buck came Holtsclaw’s way, right in front of her tree stand. Nice 7-point buck, her first one!


The fishing tip from the DNR this week is where to find Northern Pike in Michigan. As the temperatures continue to cool, fishing for Northern Pike will really pick up. Pike are extremely popular during the ice fishing season but are readily available throughout much of the year. There are many notable Northern Pike fisheries located throughout Michigan, including on Muskegon, Portage and Manistee lakes and also Michigamme and Houghton lakes. But this species can be found in many lakes and virtually all larger rivers in the state. Please note there are many regulations for Northern Pike regarding minimum size and possession limit. Read up on Northern Pike rules and regulations in the 2018 Fishing Digest. Captain Kenny Bard of Rampage Fishing Charters out of South Haven reports anglers have been doing very well with catching steelhead in the Black River and from the pier when weather permits. Anglers have been using hot n tots and flat fish for bait and have also caught some whitefish. Anglers on the Kalamazoo River have been catching a good number of steelhead, especially by the Allegan Dam. Ellinee Bait & Tackle located on Paw Paw Lake by Coloma reported not many anglers were going out fishing this past week. A reminder to ice fishermen that all their ice fishing equipment on display is 20% off before the first ice. Some nice new jigs just came in too. DNR conservation officers will be patrolling Teal Lake in Marquette County for littering ice anglers. Negaunee City manager Nate Heffron announced the city and Michigan conservation officers will be stepping up efforts to help prevent littering on Teal Lake during the winter months. For the past few years the city has been getting complaints about litter and other debris being left on the lake Heffron said. Lt. Ryan Aho, DNR District 1 Law Supervisor, said conservation officers will increase patrols, given the increased number of littering complaints. “All users of the Lake have the responsibility to clean up after themselves. Littering is a civil infraction, with violators subject to fines.”

Hunting Regular firearm deer season that seemed to take so long to get here will end Friday, November 30. Archery season will open back up December 1 through January 1, 2019. Muzzleloader season in Zones 1 and 2 is open December 1 – 16, and Zone 3 is open December 7 – 23. The Upper Peninsula Chronic Wasting Disease Task Force has taken several positive actions – working in concert with the DNR – since the October 18 confirmation that a 4-year-old doe tested positive for chronic wasting disease (CWD) in Dickinson County. Since the lone deer tested positive – the region’s first confirmation – the DNR has set up two surveillance areas around Waucedah Township, where the doe was shot in September on a deer damage control permit. Hunters are being asked to voluntarily submit deer heads for testing to help define the extent of the disease. No hunting regulation changes are in place. Michigan conservation officers in the northern Lower Peninsula are investigating the illegal killing of two bull elk, north of Atlanta. The carcasses of the two animals were discovered off Montmorency County Road 622, near Roth Road. This location is about seven miles north of Atlanta, just south of Clear Lake State Park. If anyone saw anything or has any information that would assist with the investigation, they would like to hear from you. Tips may be left anonymously and monetary rewards often are offered for information that leads to the arrest of violators. To contact investigators, please call the DNR Law Enforcement Division at the Gaylord Operations Center at 989-732-3541 or call or text the 24-hour Report All Poaching line at 800-292-7800. There are two volunteer stewardship workdays this Saturday, December 1, 2018. The first is from 9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. at Highland Recreation Area, Silo Field Trial Area. The second workday site is at Warren Dunes State Park from 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. For anyone wanting to learn more, the DNR volunteer calendar (which includes event listings with workday details) is available on the DNR volunteer stewardship page. The DNR is seeking interested candidates to serve on the Off-Road Vehicle Advisory Workgroup. Members will serve a two- or three-year term and are expected to participate in four meetings a year. This group assists the Michigan Trails Advisory Council. Those interested in applying for a spot on the workgroup can send a resume (postmarked) by December 22, 2018. For more information contact Paul Yauk at 517-284-6141.

Coloma Rod & Gun Club The Coloma Rod & Gun Club will hold their monthly CCW Class on Saturday, December 8, 2018. Class registration is held on Sunday, December 2, 2018 from 8:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. The class is taught by a certified NRA and RSO instructor and the cost of the class is $105. For more information or to be put on the list, please call (269) 621-3370.

Watervliet Rod & Gun Club The Watervliet Rod and Gun Club will hold their monthly CCW classes on December 6 and 8, 2018. Registration is on December 4, 2018, between 6:00 and 7:00 p.m. and cost of the class is $100. They will have a lawyer explaining the law pertaining to concealed carry during class. Please call (269) 468-3837 or (269) 470-9191 for more information.

Birds need moisture to maintain body temperature and sustain cellular respiration. Food provides some water, but most birds must drink from a body of water. So, how do birds drink? Most birds fill their beak by pushing it under the surface. Then they hold their heads up and let the water flow into their throats. A few species, notably doves and pigeons, utilize the same mechanisms as mammals. They place their slightly open beak in the water. When they retract their tongue, an area of low pressure develops in the mouth. Water rushes in with enough momentum it is forced over the larynx and into the throat. They don’t need to tip their heads. Swallows fly back and forth over water to scoop up water. Pelicans, on the other hand, just sit back with wide open mouths when it rains. Make a wreath, swag, or other holiday decoration at Sarett’s Greens Workshop on Saturday, December 8 at 1:00 p.m. The $15 fee includes several varieties of greens and instruction. You provide clippers, frames, wire and ribbon. Register by calling (269) 927-4832. Santa will be visiting Sarett on Sunday, December 9 from 2:30 to 4:30 p.m. Bring your camera and get a picture taken with Santa and tell him your Christmas wishes! Sarett naturalists will also have nature crafts to make and take for $1 -$2.

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