top of page

Letters to the Editor

Electric energy from solar farms makes sense

Dear Editor,

According to Sarah Mills and Madeline Kroll, researchers who study renewables and land use, from the University of Michigan, “Michigan is in the early stages of large-scale solar development.”

The boom is coming in part because the price of solar has dropped dramatically in the past 15 years, making installations viable across the country.

Utilities have been calling for more solar for years, and the Michigan legislation, passed in 2023, set targets to quickly up the share of renewable energy sources.

“Nobody’s going to force somebody to put solar on their property”, Mills said.

The state also has launched an award for local governments involved in hosting installations, which could provide more than $1 million dollars in the case of one existing larger project.

A typical solar lease also can provide landowners, including farmers about $1,100 to $1,200 per acre per year and developers depend on leasing or buying property to make their installations a reality. Some farmers lease out the least productive parts of their land and continue to raise crops on the rest.

The law gives solar developers with projects over 50 megawatts, usually 500 acres, the option to go to the state regarding permitting.

Property owners also have the discretion over which acres to lease; and they can think about appropriate proximity to neighbors, how property lines are screened and what kind of plantings cover the area.

Large solar developments usually come with bond requirements to ensure they are decommissioned after a certain period of time.

VBCAT supports a future of clean energy.

Rick Wild, Member

Van Buren Climate Action Team (VBCAT)


Life. The Other Choice.

Editor,

On Monday, May 6, Right to Life of Michigan launched Life. The Other Choice., an organization-wide refresh built around our new multi-media ads. This launch includes the new ads, a new website and brand refresh, and some fun merch – a Life. The Other Choice. baseball cap and a lapel pin. All of this can be found at rtl.org!

Our objective is laser-focused on reaching women who may consider abortion with a hopeful message that invites them to make a courageous choice for life, and to connect them with the practical supports that empower them in that choice.

It’s no secret that women in Michigan have a choice. They can choose abortion or life for their unborn children. We know that for “choice” to truly exist, women must have every opportunity to make a choice for life.

With the help of our new website and ad campaign, we can now present women with resources that help them make that beautiful choice. An unexpected pregnancy is life-changing and can bring apprehension and fear about the unknown path ahead. Future plans are interrupted, and a woman’s current resources may not be enough to provide for a child. We must reach women and connect them with support in their communities – practical support like free medical care, confidential counseling, clothing, transportation, housing assistance and more - and true compassion to help light a path forward. This is the first step to truly empowering women.

The Life. The Other Choice. ads that are now live on streaming services and broadcast TV are “Test” and “Presence”. “Test” is an incredibly powerful ad that speaks to women saying, “Whether you continue with or end your pregnancy has never been a choice of political parties or action groups. It is, and has always been, a choice of the pregnant. If you’re pregnant and want help call or text 1-800-712-HELP.” The number is a hotline that connects women with a local Pregnancy Resource Center for care she needs now. Both ads can be found at rtl.org/videos.

Then visit our homepage at rtl.org to see our new website and logo refresh and visit the shop to check out the “Life. The Other Choice.” merchandise.

Anna-Marie Pluymert

Director of Education & Communications

Right to Life of Michigan


Foster Care Month

(Press release) The Michigan Department of Health and Human Services (MDHHS) is raising awareness that more loving foster families are needed to temporarily care for children while the state works to reunify them safely with their parents during Foster Care Month.

“We are thankful for the thousands of families across Michigan who have already opened up their hearts and homes to care for youth in foster care,” said Elizabeth Hertel, MDHHS director. “There continues to be a need for more foster families to provide stable and safe family homes for children of all ages in the state’s care.”

Every person involved in foster care has a diverse background and experiences that offer a unique perspective. MDHHS has shared several stories about people who have made a difference in the lives of youth in Michigan in Faces of Foster Care.

Michigan has approximately 10,000 children in foster care and temporary foster homes are needed for children of all ages, especially teens, sibling groups and youth who have special needs. These children have been victims of abuse and neglect, and need a nurturing environment until they can be safely reunified with their parents or – in a smaller number of cases – until they can find adoptive homes when it’s not safe for them to return home.

MDHHS provides foster families a daily rate to help with the care of foster children based on the age and needs of the child. Foster families also receive a semi-annual clothing allowance, and many families qualify for reimbursement for the costs of day care. Children in foster care are eligible for Medicaid, which pays for medical, dental and mental health care.

The first step to becoming a foster parent is contacting a Foster Care Navigator. Navigators are experienced foster parents who can answer questions, help individuals find an agency that’s right for them and provide guidance along their journey to becoming a foster parent. They can be reached at 855-MICHKIDS with additional information available at Fcnp.org. Foster Care Navigators are also able to assist families with the foster home licensing process.

To learn more about foster care, visit Michigan.gov/HopeforaHome.

0 comments

Related Posts

See All

Supporting our veterans and military families

Last week, the House passed H.R. 8580, the Military Construction, Veterans Affairs, and Related Agencies Appropriations Act for Fiscal Year (FY) 2025. This is the first of the FY 2025 appropriations b

Standing strong against corporate welfare

Call it what you will—SOAR, MEGA, “Make it in Michigan”—legislative Democrats are dead-set on their corporate welfare agenda. Despite Republican efforts to redirect funding toward long-term investment

Comments


bottom of page